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Pumpkin Biscuits

January 21, 2012

Seriously, who wouldn’t want to wake up to these on a snowy Sunday morning?  Well, someone who doesn’t like biscuits or pumpkin, I suppose.  But the rest of you?  You love these.  So do I.  These biscuits manage to be flaky and moist at the same time, with a pleasant if non-assertive pumpkin flavor and just a hint of cinnamon.  I think they taste especially scrumptious with a hot cup of coffee or cocoa.  The Midwestern Gentleman agrees.

Pumpkin Biscuits

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 tsp salt

2 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/3 cup shortening, frozen

1 cup pureed pumpkin

1/4 cup buttermilk plus more for glaze

1/2 cup confectioners sugar or 2 Tbsp vanilla sugar

Preheat the oven to 425 F.  Sift the first 5 ingredients together into a medium-sized bowl.  Whisk together the buttermilk and the pumpkin puree in a small bowl or 2-cup measuring cup.

Cut the frozen shortening into the flour mixture until the shortening resembles tiny pebbles.  Add the pumpkin/buttermilk mixture all at once, and toss with a wooden spoon just until the dough comes together.  Do not overmix or gluten will form, turning the biscuits into tough little hockey pucks instead of flaky bits of goodness.  Gather the dough into a rough ball, knead for about 30 seconds to even out the dough, and then roll out the dough to between 1/4″ and 1/2″ thick.  Cut into biscuits.

Lay the biscuits on a foil or parchment lined baking sheet and brush their tops with buttermilk.  (Optional: sprinkle with vanilla sugar before baking, or wait to glaze them with icing afterwards.)

Bake for 25-30 minutes, until tops are golden brown and edges look flaky.  Remove from oven and cool on wire rack so the biscuits don’t turn soggy.  Let cool slightly.

For Glaze: whisk buttermilk into confectioners sugar one teaspoon at a time, until glaze reaches desired consistency (pourable, but not runny).  Drizzle over warm biscuits and serve.

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